Shell and VW biofuel report considered an attack against EVs

A new study financed by Shell and Volkswagen has been criticised for downplaying the push for electric vehicles

 

A study produced on behalf of the global oil company Royal Dutch Shell and German auto manufacturer Volkswagen has been accused of resisting the efforts of the European Union, which has been pushing for the advancement of electric vehicles and other energy efficient cars.

The study, titled ‘Integrated Fuels and Vehicles Roadmap to 2030 and Beyond’ was produced by Roland Berger with significant financial backing from the oil and auto industry giants, Shell and VW, who, according to an EU source have a “shared interest” in promoting the benefits of biofuels.

Following last year’s UN Climate Change Conference, held in Paris, the EU has introduced two new targets for 2025 and for 2030 to help successfully achieve the fuel efficiency levels which were promised by EU officials during the UN conference.

The plans include pushing for the increased use of electric vehicles and other low-efficiency vehicles, including hydrogen-powered cars. The EU is aiming to cut transport greenhouse gas emissions by 60 per cent by the year 2050.

The Roland Berger study has been criticised as it appears to downplay the EU’s new fuel efficiency plans and instead focuses upon biofuel technology, claiming that these natural fuels are the best way forward for a greener auto industry.

A vice-president at Shell, Colin Crooks, said that “liquid fuels will remain essential during the [low-carbon] transition”, and Ulrich Eichhorn, VW’s head of research, said that electric vehicles are currently just “building blocks”.

However, there are some in the automotive industry who think that VW and Shell are underestimating the public’s interest in low-efficiency vehicles, especially considering how 400,000 pre-orders for recently unveiled electric cars have already been recorded.

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