New poll suggests half of the UK would not be passengers in a driverless car

As driverless cars take to public roads later this month, half of Britons would not be passengers in the self-driving vehicles it has emerged.

Half of Britons would be unwilling passengers in driverless cars over safety worries, with 16 per cent professing to feel ‘horrified’ by the belief of unmanned vehicles driving on British roads.

Driverless Car

Driverless cars will take to the roads of Coventry, Bristol, Milton Keynes and Greenwich in January in a bid to examine the challenges of bringing vehicles that are automated to the United Kingdom ‘s roads, assessing their impact on congestion and road safety.

Four in ten Britons would not trust an autonomous car to drive considering it would jeopardise the welfare of pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

A quarter said duty should lie solely with the car manufacturer, while 18 per cent of the 953 questioned said the person supporting the wheel of the driverless car should be responsible.

Google has been developing driverless technology for many years, and unveiled a fully-functioning prototype for testing it on the roads in San Francisco during December this past year, in getting ready. The search engine hopes to bring the Google Self-Driving car to marketplace between 2017 and 2020.

It was clear motorists were already challenging the impact they will have on their lives although we may be years away from driverless cars outnumbering conventional vehicles on British roads.

The driverless technology industry is estimated to be worth GBP900 billion worldwide by 2025, a year, currently growing at 16 per cent.