New cars set to only need first MoT after four years, rather than the current three

The increase could potentially save motorists over £100 million a year

 
Under new plans being considered by the Government, new cars will be exempt from needing an MoT for the first four years, rather than the current three.

The Department for Transport (DfT) has put in motion fresh discussions, looking at stretching the first MoT period for new cars and motorcycles from the current three years to four.

According to the DfT, if the new law is passed, it might possibly be introduced as early as 2018 and could save UK motorists more than £100 million a year in MoT test costs.

New cars set to only need first MoT after four years, rather than the current three

New cars set to only need first MoT after four years, rather than the current three © Copyright Nigel Mykura and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

 

The new plans are set to be announced by the Transport Secretary, Chris Grayling.

The three-year rule has been in operation since 1967 but with such advancements in car technology, reliability and safety, the time seems right for the newly proposed law to be introduced.

Over the past 10 years alone, advancements in safety have led to a drop in car accidents involving three to four-year-old vehicles with defects, down from 155 in 2006 to just 57 in 2015.

According to the Transport Minister Andrew Jones, new vehicles are now a lot safer than they were 50 years ago and for this reason, it seems the right time for an update to the MoT rule, which will also help motorists in the UK to save a few pounds too.

The new MoT rule, which is set for introduction after consultation, will see England, Scotland and Wales brought into line with Northern Ireland, as with a number of other European countries, such as France and Italy.

As reported by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), around 29 million MoT tests are undertaken each year in the UK to make sure vehicles are legally safe to be on the road and, according to the DVSA, faulty lights are more often than not the main reason why a vehicle fails its MoT test.

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