Exposed: 80% admit to driving illegally

From bald tyres to mobile phones – majority of motorists admit to breaking the law

Four out of five British motorists admit to have broken the law whilst driving in the last year.

A leading UK vehicle leasing company carried out an anonymous phone poll and discovered huge numbers of people who routinely drive while using the phone, have no tax or insurance, speed, or have a vehicle that’s unfit for the road.

According to Flexed.co.uk, it’s an attitude that shows scant regard for the law of the road and could lead to deaths and life-changing injuries. Legal drivers pay the price of this national crime wave through increased insurance premiums, Flexed claims.

“To say we were shocked is an understatement to say the least,” flexed.co.uk spokesman Mark Hall said. “We expected people to admit some minor wrong-doing, but what we heard simply beggars belief.”

Over 1100 drivers were asked if they had broken motoring laws within the past twelve months.

• Yes 79%
• No 16%
• Not prepared to answer 5%

Of those who said they had broken the law, the following “crimes” were admitted (some owned up to more than one offence):

• Using a mobile phone 37%
• Speeding 32%
• Illegal parking 25%
• No seat belt 19%
• Drove through a red light 17%
• Drove while drunk 11%
• Worn tyres 9%
• Expired tax disc 7%
• No MOT 6%
• No Insurance 6%
• Left the scene of an accident 1%
• Other 8%

While most of these can be classed as minor infringements, it’s the small yet significant number of unroadworthy cars and incapable drivers that are the most worrying, Flexed says.

“More than one tenth admitted drink-driving in the last year, and that’s a frightening statistic,” said Mark Hall.

Unfortunately, stretched police forces with tightened budgets mean the chance of being caught is lower, and some drivers think there’s a risk worth taking, said Flexed, calling for a high-profile police crackdown on offenders.

“Unfortunately, when you’re on a busy road, any of the drivers around you could be uninsured or driving a dangerous car,” Hall said. “That’s a sobering thought, and something needs to be done.

“Insurance premiums are high enough without armies of illegal drivers driving them higher.”