61% of drivers use their car horn once a month

Drivers admit poor behaviour on increasingly congested roads

Britain’s impatient drivers are becoming more aggressive and a potential risk to other road users, with over 60% admitting to using their horn in anger in the last month.

That’s the opinion of a leading UK car leasing company whose recent survey found that motorists are becoming increasingly likely to resort to anti-social methods to push ahead in queues to try to shave a few seconds off their journeys.

The Flexed.co.uk company says that both commercial and private drivers are just as likely to resort to jumping traffic lights, sounding their horn or pushing in front of other vehicles on Britain’s congested roads.

“The behaviour of Britain’s drivers has clearly deteriorated in recent years,” said Flexed.co.uk spokesman Mark Hall, “And many motorists aren’t shy in admitting to pushing the laws or displaying the worst of manners, especially during the rush hour.”

According to a wide-ranging survey of thousands of road users, Flexed.co.uk found that nearly two-thirds had been aggressive toward other drivers while driving in heavy traffic.

Asked what – if any – anti-social tactics they had resorted to on the road (drivers gave more than one answer):

• 61% said they had sounded their horn at another driver out of annoyance
• 33% Changed lanes multiple times in traffic jams
• 27% Pushed in at road junctions
• 15% Driven down an empty filter lane to push in at the front at traffic lights
• 8% Driven in the cycle lane to jump a queue
• 4% Driven on the hard shoulder to jump a queue

Flexed.co.uk says that it’s clear that normal driving rules go out of the window in traffic jams, and it can be every driver for themselves.

“In the cocoon of your car, you’re essentially powerless in the face of what the road throws at you, and people choose ways of lashing out they wouldn’t do at other times,” said Mark Hall “One driver even told us he beeped at a set of traffic lights because they went red just as he drove up to them.”

Asked what other drivers do in heavy traffic that annoys the most, the results were unequivocal:

• 60% Pushing in front of the queue
• 18% Letting other drivers out of side roads
• 10% Not moving up fast enough in the queue
• 8% Cycles and motorbikes weaving through traffic
• 4% Other

Flexed.co.uk notes that the second-placed behaviour here is an act of goodwill toward other road users, and this goes some way to showing how selfish drivers can be when mildly inconvenienced by a queue.

“Forgive us for paraphrasing Jean-Paul Sartre here,” said Hall,” but one thing’s clear on Britain’s roads – Hell is other drivers.”